NHS ARTifacts Gallery

The NHS ARTifacts Gallery was launched at the beginning of our 2013-2014 school year. The gallery is designed to provide all North High School staff the opportunity to showcase their students’ work in a professional exhibition space by infusing art into their curriculum. This exhibition space is facilitated, organized and installed by the Sheboygan North High Art Department.

“infusing art through learning and collaboration”


2017-2018

September 5 – 30, 2017

Ms. McGoldrick

U.S. History

Description:  In the process of learning about the Relief, Recovery, and Reform brought on by the New Deal, students participate in the imitation of a WPA poster.  The WPA (Works Progress Administration), between the years 1935 – 1943, printed over 35,000 different designs to stir the public’s imagination for education, theater, health, safety, and travel.  The posters were an attempt to educate society while putting artists back to work during the Great Depression.  Due to the fragile nature of the posters only 2,000 have survived in their original state.  
Ms. McGoldrick’s U.S. History students begin by finding a WPA poster they would like to imitate through the Library of Congress online archives .  The challenge is that she only allows them to use paper to reconstruct the poster.  The students find it challenging to use only one medium and then see how the process lends itself to fantastic pieces.

Gallery


2016-2017

Spring 2017 Faculty Art Show

featuring illustrations by Doug Arthur and quilts by Vivian Gerk

May 1– May 19, 2017


Ms. Cavanaugh 

April 3 – April 29, 2017

Rain Haiku

After studying the monsoon weather pattern in India, students in African Asian World class were asked create their own illustrated Haiku on the topic of rain. Students contemplated the way rain is perceived in different cultures, in different environments, and at different times of the year. Rain is evocative of many different emotions, which are captured in the students’ Haiku.

Greeting Cards for India

After studying the principles of Hinduism, students created “Love Day” greeting cards to sell in India. Students learned of how some Indians have been protesting Valentine’s Day because of its focus on spending money and that it represents an alien culture. Indian culture recognizes several types of love; romantic love, love between best friends, universal love, and love of the earth. Each of these types of love is represented in the various cards the students have created.

The students were also required to write a marketing proposal for their proto-type Indian Love Day card.


Ms. Cavanaugh and Mrs. Jesinski

March 3 – March 31, 2017

Every year freshman students in Ms. Cavanaugh and Mrs. Jesinski African Asian World History/Cultural Studies classes create History Day projects related to an annual theme.  The theme this year was “Taking a Stand In History.”  Students conduct research of primary and secondary sources and they can present their findings in a variety of ways.  What you see here are exhibits, the most popular type of presentation.


Mrs. Martinez

French Level 4 & 5

February 3 – February 28, 2017

These pieces of art were created by French level 4 and 5 students. After learning and discussing French painters in class, students had to choose a French artist, research, and present their painter to the class.  Included in their presentation, they had to create their own original art piece based on sources of inspiration from their chosen artist and research.

blanca1


FA2016 Artist in Residence Erica Huntzinger

January 10 – January 20, 2017

ericahuntzingersoloshow


NHS Faculty Group Show

featuring drawings by Mr. Yedica, photography by Mr. Delong, and poetry by Ms. Cavanaugh

December 5 – January 2, 2016

nhs-gallery-faculty


Mrs. Flynn | Spanish

November 7 – November 30, 2016

img_1756

Gallery


Dr. Michels | Social Studies

October 12 – November 3, 2016

The earliest documented cave art is dated to around 40,000 years ago. During their unit on the Upper Paleolithic Era (40,000 to 10,000 years ago), students in Dr. Michels’ Western Civilization class created their own. The goal was to tell a story from their lives using only images. Students were encouraged to utilize some of the stylistic elements that are common in cave art. Students also wrote a brief essay telling their story and explaining the symbolism in the art. 

Gallery


2015-2016 Exhibitions

Dr. Michels (African and Asian World)

April 20 – May 13, 2016

Students in African and Asian Cultural Studies classes have created mind maps that represent what they have recently learned about South Asia. The topics on the mind maps include: the earliest civilizations in South Asia, the arrival of European traders, colonialism, Gandhi and the independence movement, and geography.


Ms. Cavanaugh (African and Asian World)

March 9 – April 8, 2016

Rain Haiku

After studying the monsoon weather pattern in India, students in African Asian World class were asked create their own illustrated Haiku on the topic of rain. Students contemplated the way rain is perceived in different cultures, in different environments, and at different times of the year. Rain is evocative of many different emotions, which are captured in the students’ Haiku.

Greeting Cards for India

After studying the principles of Hinduism, students created “Love Day” greeting cards to sell in India. Students learned of how some Indians have been protesting Valentine’s Day because of its focus on spending money and that it represents an alien culture. Indian culture recognizes several types of love; romantic love, love between best friends, universal love, and love of the earth. Each of these types of love is represented in the various cards the students have created.

The students were also required to write a marketing proposal for their prototype Indian Love Day card.


Mr. Yedica (Western Religion)

February 10 – March 4, 2016

Western Religions students are currently learning about Indigenous Religions and have produced “Dreamtime Art” originally created by the Australian Aboriginal people. The art is described as thus:

Dreamtime Origins

“The Aborigines learned about the origins of the tribe through their Dreamtime creation myths, that told of the significant actions of the creators. The myths were the basis of Aboriginal society and were responsible for providing certainty about existence. They contributed to their survival and it is beyond dispute that they survived for thousands of years. The Australian aborigines believed that the land they occupied was once vacuous – empty. This belief was a source of great mystery to them. It was also a great truth that was known with absolute certainty, because the ancestors had said this was the way things once were. Then, during what has become known as the Dreamtime, the land, the sky above and all they contained were formed by the actions of supernatural and mysterious beings. 

Geoff Moore. “Myth, Mystery, and Meaning of the Dreamtime”.


Mrs. Flynn (Spanish)

December 8 – January 4, 2015

After studying Spanish art, Spanish 5 students will replicate a masterpiece of the artist of their choice. Using the Spanish language, students will present why they chose that particular artist and piece. They will teach us background information about the artist as well as analyze the masterpiece. The genres students chose included etching, painting, and murals.


Dr. Michels (Social Studies)

November 16 – December 5, 2015

Students in my African and Asian History and Cultural Studies classes recently completed their African Cultural Groups mind-maps. For this project they focused on four different cultural/ethnic groups in Africa: the !Kung, the Dogon, the Fulani, and the Mbuti. The topics that they included on the mind-maps included culture, traditions, personal adornment, relationships with the land and animals, religion/beliefs, architecture, art, geography, political structures, the role of wealth, material possessions, music, family structure, and history. For the mind-map they divided their finished projects into four sections to demonstrate who these people are and what makes them unique.


Ms. Cavanaugh (African Asian World)

September 2 – October 2, 2015

Students in African and Asian Cultural worked with the Midwest Artist Studios lesson, Be One With Nature:  Painting Your Surrounding, as part of the unit on Japan.  Throughout the course students have been learning various techniques for deep relaxation based on focus.  This unit allowed students to apply meditation to nature and art.  Based on Jane Ryder’s suggestion, each student was given a simple viewfinder and sent them to the school courtyard to study nature and to sketch a few images.  The next two class periods were spent in the classroom, where students created watercolor compositions based on the work of Ryder.  Ryder’s work was the ideal inspiration for this because it is very detailed, and yet is not perfectly realistic.  This allowed students who did not view themselves as artistic, to be willing to take a chance. This was the sort of valuable educational experience that provided a life lesson in the power of art, nature, and meditation.


2014-2015 Exhibitions

Mrs. Diven (Broadcasting)

April 22 – May 13, 2015

In a world full of technology, students took time to become unplugged by creating these analog collages with North High’s Artist in Residence, Sara Willadsen. Tiffany Diven’s Broadcasting students spent two class periods searching through books and magazines as well as an assortment of miscellaneous materials provided to find images, patterns, and paper surfaces that spoke to them. The collected scraps were then used to make pieces guided by their individual interests and helped them to understand how working with such a versatile and physical medium can bring entire focus to the present. Numerous themes are explored within these works along with a wide array of materials and artistic styles used.

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Mrs. Martinez (French)

March 18 – April 17, 2015

This exhibition showcases paintings created by the French class. The paintings are based on the research of French artists, their life, influences, time period, and painting styles resulting in original works of art influenced by the French artists.

frenchpaintings


Ms. Cavanaugh (Social Studies)

January 19 – January 31, 2015

African Poetry and Cosmology Projects Students in Ms. Cavanaugh’s African Asian World class studied the Atlantic slave trade and wrote poems to express their personal understanding. Students then studied the various ways in which the Congolese Cosmogram was brought to the New World by enslaved Africans, who strengthened and deepened its meanings in their new home. Students used their understanding of Congolese cosmology to create their own cosmograms, or dikenga symbols.

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Dr. Michels + Mr. Johnson (Social Studies)

November 21 – December 12, 2014

drmichelsstudentart

During the Upper Paleolithic Era, cave paintings appeared in both Europe and Asia as early as 40,000 years ago. The purpose and meanings behind these paintings have been subject to a variety of theories and interpretations. Regardless, these paintings served as a way for our ancestors to express themselves through art. To conclude our unit on the Upper Paleolithic, Mr. Johnson and Dr. Michels had students create pieces of artwork inspired by these cave paintings as a way express who they are and what is important to them. Additionally, students wrote artists statements explaining the significance of their creations.


Mrs. Flynn (Spanish)

November 1 – 21, 2014

Spanish 5

After studying Spanish art, Spanish 5 students will replicate a masterpiece of the artist of their choice. Using the Spanish language, students will present their work to the class, telling us why they chose that particular artist and piece. They will teach us background information about the artist as well as analyze the masterpiece. The genres students chose included fashion, photography, painting, murals and architecture. 


Kyle Jeske

2007 North High Art Alumnus

October 1 – 30, 2014

IMG_5713Kyle has been creating artwork all of his life, and a hobby has turned into a passion. He has completed an Art minor at the University of Minnesota, taking classes in Painting, Intermediate Painting, Advanced Painting, Drawing, Concepts in Visual Art, 19th & 20th Century Art History, and Gothic Architecture & Painting in Paris.

Artist Statement

I am an acrylic painter currently residing in Minneapolis, MN. I paint vibrant images in a playful manner/style, often of cityscapes or abstract work. My hobby of art has evolved into one of my deepest passions. I try to find the color in life, and portray it on canvas.

IMG_5702I encounter inspiration for my works in the urban atmosphere in which I live, as well as in my travels. I find a wide variety of subject matter that keeps me continuously interested and engaged. I think it is important for an artist to explore many different styles and ultimately find their own. In my view, art is creativity where anything is possible. Each and every blank new canvas is exciting in its own way.


Mr. Juarez & Mrs. Mattern (Art) 

Art Faculty Show

September 2 – 30, 2014

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Mr. Juarez Artist Statement

My paintings are driven by a collection of certain things I feel can influence my work. In my studio I reduce those visuals into paintings with a minimalistic approach. I am able to bring what is important to the surface so that the viewer can interpret his/her own meaning.  

Mrs. Mattern Artist Statement

Among all of the fabulous methods of artistic expression, my favorite art medium is oil paint. I have enjoyed exploring new painting techniques for most of my life. I usually use thick, impasto brush strokes loaded with beautiful colors to describe my subjects. Part of my goal as a painter has been to represent the essence of my subjects—be they landscapes, narratives, or portraits. My aim is also to celebrate the beauty of color and the joy of painting.

My pantings are about water, fluidity, and floating. I would like viewers to feel refreshed by the painted reflections, refractions and submersions. I invite you to take a dip!


2013-2014 Exhibitions

Dr. Michels (Social Studies)

April 7 – May 7, 2014

Location: 2nd Floor Gallery

Students in my African Asian History classes created mind maps in which they examined the geography, history, archaeology, and cultures of South Asia, from the earliest inhabitants to independence movements in the mid 20th century.


Mr. Yedica (Western Civilization)

“Dreamtime: Australian Aboriginal Art”

March 13 – April 4, 2014

Location: 2nd Floor Gallery

Students in Western World Religions reproduced Australian Aboriginal “Dreamtime” art for class.  The Aborigine people of Australia would mark / paint the back of tree bark showing sacred animals in their culture.  The purpose was to understand the “essence” or “sacredness” behind the physical animal.  Sometimes this understanding came in our dreams, other times when we entered a dream-like state of consciousness while awake.  Tapping into that “sacred behind the profane” enabled one to derive a deeper understanding of life and possibly harness that same “energy” or “power” the animal possessed.  


Mr. Yedica (Wester Civilization)

“Daoism Art”

February 17 – March 7, 2014

Location: 2nd Floor Gallery

The Eastern Religions students tried to capture the essence of their images in practicing Taoist Art.  Modeled after the 13th and 14th century Taoist Chinese school of painting, each picture is meant to show the “chi” or internal energy they have harnessed and expressed in the painting.  Then the artist shows the yin and yang through using color and space to create harmony and balance through the work.

 

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Ms. Cavanaugh and Mr. Michels (Social Studies)

“Cosmograms”

January 20 – February 7, 2014

Location: 2nd Floor Gallery

20140124_110644When African captives from the Congo were taken to America they brought their world-view with them.  In America they met up with each other on plantations and worked together to keep their traditions alive.  They also met Africans from other tribes with different traditions.  Most African Americans also embraced Christianity.  The result of this cultural diffusion was that the Congo Cosmogram was represented in a multitude of ways within the African American community, and was strengthened and deepened to also embrace aspects of other African cultures, as well as Christian meanings.


Mr. Yedica’s Eastern Religion

“Sikh Art”

December 15 – January 15, 2014

Location: 2nd Floor Gallery

The Sikh Art project will be a watercolor project where the Eastern Religions students individually painted Guru Gobind Singh.  He was the Sikh religious leader who formed the Khalsa, a military order where Sikh men ceremonially joined, all had to wear a turban, grow out their beard, all took the last name “Singh” which means “Lion.”  The purpose of the project was to show the “mass production” of Sikh Khalsa members in the form of mass produced Pop Art style of Andy Warhol.

Infusing Art through Learning and Collaboration


Mr. Johnson’s (Social Studies)

November 25 – December 13, 2013

Location: 2nd Floor between World Language and Computer Lab Wings

In Western Civilization we study Humanism and how that manifest itself in the art of the Renaissance. I have an activity where they have to draw several things. We Call it to “Think LIke Leonardo da Vinci”. They draw upside down and also draw with their non-dominant hand. It is about seeing, drawing, thinking and the creative mind. 

In a separate, but related activity, my WC students were asked to journal; “What is the value of art?

These two activities will be combined as an example of how art and writing are complimentary.

Here are a couple of writing examples.

Student entry #1

“Art is very valuable. Art expresses one’s feelings and shows emotions of a person. Art describes with pictures which words cannot describe. Art adds beauty to life and magmatron to life. Art makes things look more special and eye catching. Art also describes everything about specific things and shows the color of objects. Art is very valuable to everyone and should be expressed by oneself”.  – Happy X.

Student entry #2

“Art is very important because it allows us to express our feelings in a unique and creative way. It’s also a way to reflect. There is a lot of symbolism used in art, and it can actually help us learn. There are so many forms of art in our world, and most people don’t realize how huge art is in our lives”. – Thomas L

Here is a brief video on What is the Value of Art.


Mrs. Flynn’s Spanish 5 Class

November 5 – 22, 2013

Location: 2nd Floor between World Language and Computer Lab Wings

Spanish 5 students were offered the option of speaking to the class about a Spanish artist’s life or choosing a Spanish masterpiece to paint and explain to the class. Those that have chosen the masterpiece option will paint a masterpiece of their choice and then share it with our class. They will include a brief biography of the painter and a more in-depth discussion of the work. 

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Mrs. Mattern’s Art Foundations 1 + Senior Art 1 | Op Art

October 8 – October 31, 2013

Location: 2nd Floor between World Language and Computer Lab Wings

Students from Art Foundations I and Senior Art I created Op Art designs incorporating subject matter of their own choice. Their dynamic designs have a feeling of movement, which is created by the effects of repetition and contrast upon the eye. Sixteen of these artworks are displayed in our new North High School gallery for art integration, which is located on the second floor overlooking the courtyard. 


Mai Koua Yang and Lee Xiong, class of 2007

September 4 – October 4, 2013

Location: 2nd Floor between World Language and Computer Lab Wings

In the Sheboygan Press >>> click here

MAI KOUA YANG

Artist Statement

Land by Mai Koua YangThe Hmong American Experience is an on going investigation of what it means to be Hmong in America. As an artist, I work from a variety of mediums to observe, explore and reflect upon the experiences of what Hmongness is and how that defines who I am.

Growing up with both western and eastern ideals about identity, I am interested by the stages of identity loss, historical trauma, and the integration of cultures and traditions while living in America. As a member of the second generation of Hmong people in America, I feel a sense of responsibility to celebrate, educate and create conversations about what it means to be Hmong and America or vice versa. 

LEE XIONG

Artist Statement

Becoming Myths #13 by Lee XiongI want to remember the little girl whose face looks like a snowy afternoon and the old man who always wore those rusty yellow shoes. I want to remember how I felt under that red umbrella with Romeo and his dead cat, and how I could taste seaweed floating in the fog of a fishing village’s street. For I am quick to forget the lady who became butterflies and my grandfather, the gnarled tree. They are becoming myths, I tell you, and I do not want to forget how they painted me anew, so I will paint them for you. 

Click here to listen to their artist talks.

“infusing art through learning and collaboration”

>>> click to download >>> NHS Exhibition Space Flyer

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