Artist Lecture Series

Source: Canva

The Sheboygan North High Artist Lecture Series (est. 2010) is an in-school program at Sheboygan North High School. We invite local, regional, national, and international visual artists to share their journey as artists with the beginning, intermediate, and advanced art classes. Visiting artists present and introduce art students to such as but not limited to: how to present a portfolio, share a body of work, facilitate an art demonstration, or talk about about their artistic journey. This provides our students the opportunity to interact with the artists. 

In 2014, the North High Art Department introduced Skyping contemporary artists into the art room through a project called, the Midwest Artist Studios Project. One of the project’s goals was to provide a way for art teachers and students to interact with these MAS artists via Skype. Through this platform, artists and students had the opportunity to talk about the work they have created or in the process of creating. This exchange resulted in critiques, Q & A’s about each other’s work, or just the opportunity to talk ‘art shop’.

Mr. Juarez decided to make these Skype talks more formal through a program titled, “Skype Session Series”. Each month brings a new artist from anywhere in the U.S. and beyond into the art room to engage art students in meaningful discussions, constructive criticism, and provide the opportunity for them to begin networking with artists who are doing what they are passionate about. These invited artists are paired with students who are working in the same medium and/or genre. The sessions are screened for the entire class to participate in this experience. Some of our past school year’s line up were Joe Bussell (KS), Andrea Guzzetta (CA), Jay Riggio (CA), and Jane Ryder (IA).

Due to COVID-19 we will be offering our artist lecture series as virtual artist talks for this 2020-2021 school year. 

The 2020-2021 Sheboygan North High Virtual Artist Lecture Series is supported by a grant from the Kohler Foundation, Inc. This artist talk series is in collaboration with Artdose Magazine.


In this episode artist Sally Carson talks about her love for letterpress printing, her journey from a former art gallery owner to her current artistic practice as a graphic designer, and working with today’s aspiring artists.

Sally Carson is a graphic designer who took a letterpress workshop and fell in love! Her wonderful friend who was running the workshop was teaching them about inking and said you want the ink to look like VELVET and sound like BACON! Well, who doesn’t want to make Velvet Bacon every day?! Since then Carson has been hooked. Currently, she prints on a 1923 Chandler & Price platen press. She has about 50 square feet of space in her studio. She is working on building a larger type collection. She uses polymer plates for custom designs and marketing materials.

Artist website: sallycarsongraphicdesign.com

This artist talk is supported by The Kohler Foundation, Inc. In collaboration with Sheboygan North High School. 


In this episode, Madison-based artist Katherine Steichen Rosing talks about her love for the outdoors, reviving childhood memories, and embracing the use texture and color. 


As a native Wisconsinite, our forests and lakes are an important part of my soul. Forests reveal cycles of time and nature which emerge in my paintings and drawings coded as rhythmic patterns of line, negative space, color, and texture.


Every forest is different, and ever changing. Phases of life can be seen everywhere from the slender saplings and immense mature trees, to the diseased and fallen. In the quiet pools within the forests, ripples from insects, animals, and drizzling rain interact and disappear — ephemeral events. 


Immersed in a forest, lost in the luscious whorls of lichen, I remember that lichen can be a sign of clean air, or a weakening tree. The rhythmic contrasts of narrow and wide trunks, vertical, diagonal, or horizontal, narrate the history of the forest from the elders to the saplings. I feel the bodies of the trees dwarf and engulf me making me part of the forest, for the moment. Peering at ripples on a pond, I wonder about the disturbances above and below. The chaos and tumult of modern human life melts away for a little while and I am in a timeless zone. 


Surface and color are important in my paintings where I develop relief surfaces to enhance the play of light and color like nature’s textures. I work in a wide range of sizes and formats from intimate oval paintings on birch panel to very large paintings on unstretched canvas and ten foot long scroll drawings on archival Tyvek. I like the intimacy of small works invite exploration of the surface while huge works engulf and surround us like wilderness.

Katherine Steichen Rosing‘s paintings and drawings have been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the United States and abroad, including Milwaukee, Chicago, New York, Washington D.C., Tokyo, and Beijing. Her works are included in numerous collections internationally including the State of Wisconsin Collection, Northwestern Mutual, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI. 


In addition to an active exhibition career, Ms. Rosing has taught studio art courses at colleges and universities for over 20 years in Madison and Chicago. Born and raised in Appleton, Wisconsin, she earned her undergraduate degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and an MFA in Painting and Drawing from Northern Illinois University-DeKalb.

Artist website: studioksr.com

This virtual artist talk is supported by The Kohler Foundation, Inc.


In this episode, Canadian-based artist Katie Lemieux talks about her love for large-scale ceramic works, communicating through the use of texture, embracing the business side of art, and being a full-time artist after graduating from the MFA program from UW-Milwaukee Peck School of the Arts in 2019. 

“Through my sculptural and illustrative practice, I explore visual cues of non-verbal communication and expression. I look to lure the viewer into replicating expressions or postures before them, signaling an empathetic response. I work to create an atmosphere that demands a social code switch, an altering of social behavior. In regards to materiality, the rawness of the ceramic medium allows me to reflect on the fundamentality of the process. Illustration gives me the opportunity to explore rich and complex textures in a two dimensional space, recreating depth through tonal value and shadow. The elemental qualities of clay and charcoal I find physically relevant to our own existence. Our flesh is manipulated into folds and creases as we bend and stretch. Clay has the capacity to recreate the more subtle and romantic aspects of our bodies, and empathy can be experienced through familiar, tactile traits and imagery. This is what drives my artistic practice. ” – 2020 

Katie Lemieux was born in Thunder Bay, Ontario. After receiving her HBFA at Lakehead University in Fine Art, Katie completed her Masters Degree in ceramic sculpture at University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, USA. Her sculptures and production works encompass a variety of techniques including Mishima, Sgraffito and relief carving. She has showcased internationally in Canada, South Korea, Europe, China and USA, and has participated in residencies including Jingdezhen, Sanbao, China and a Virtual Residency in Busan, South Korea.

In addition to her art practice, Katie operates as a support worker for youth and adults with disabilities. This profession plays an integral part in her social research and art practice, as she is continually navigating non-verbal communication, social interactions and body language.  Currently Katie continues her exhibition work in her home studio and enjoys experimenting with elements of the figure, abstracted iterations of emotion and pursuing her research of communicative capacities within humans.

Artist website: www.studiolemieux.com

This virtual artist talk is supported by The Kohler Foundation, Inc.


In this episode, Milwaukee-based artist Liala Amin talks about her self-discovery journey, embracing her culture, addressing mental health, and finding the freedom to follow her own voice. 

At its core, my art is a visual journal. A therapeutic documentation of emotion, growth, and discovery. I rely on intuition as I allow lines to flow and form organic, and sometimes chaotic, patterns. But within chaos there is a union of consciousness and the unknown, creativity and transformation. 

My art is a feminine view inspired by a combination of myth, history, and personal experiences. I want to subvert singular expectations of womanhood and present femininity as multifaceted and fully autonomous. Multiple materials allow me to express different ideas and I enjoy incorporating different media in each artwork. I encourage the viewer to look closer and take in the details, reflecting lights, and shifting colors. Life changes depending on our view: we become illuminated differently by every new perspective.

Liala Amin is a multidisciplinary artist exploring the facets of femininity through themes of spirituality, mythology, and personal identity. While painting is her preferred medium, her work includes mixed media paintings, drawings, and textiles. She flows between mediums to explore the intuitive nature of  art making. Amin considers her art a visual journal and an outlet to manifest introspection, storytelling, and process.
Amin graduated from the Peck School of the Arts at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee  in 2014 with a Bachelors of Fine Arts in Fibers. Her work has been exhibited within Midwest group exhibitions and has received features in several publications. She is currently an Artist in Residence at Var West Gallery in Milwaukee.

Artist website: lialathecreative.com

This virtual artist talk is supported by The Kohler Foundation, Inc.


In this episode, artist Mel Kolstad talks about her creative process, the joy of working small, and the art of drypoint printmaking. 

In 2018, Mel Kolstad was honored to present a TEDx talk about her art at TEDxFondduLac. It was entitled,“Channeling your Inner Kid for your Career”, and she spoke about how the things we loved when we were kids many times find a way into our lives when we’re adults. 

It’s an axiom she lives every day. In her art practice, which has narrowed considerably in the last three years or so, she creates tiny drypoint and watercolor prints, usually in large series of 25 or more. Each of these series’ themes hearkens straight to the things she loved as a kid – vintage ephemera, her stamp collection, anything tiny, anything having to do with foreign language. 

In creating these works, she is fortunate enough to be able to relive the magic she initially felt when experiencing these things more than 40 years ago, and feeling the joy and wonder of surrounding herself in her interests makes going to work every day a sheer pleasure. She never runs out of ideas. 

Artist website: melkolstad.com

This virtual artist talk is supported by The Kohler Foundation, Inc.


Jay Riggio (CA)

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April 2020, SchoolArts Magazine