Artist Lecture Series kicks off in October with artist, Cristian Andersson

CRISTIAN ANDERSSON, ARTIST (APPLETON)

October 11, 2018

Period 6

Room 221

(not open to the public)

click image to enlarge

BIO

Cristian Andersson is an artist working in Appleton, Wisconsin. While much of his work tends towards abstract painting, he believes that the medium must fit the message and will experiment with installation and performance based mechanisms to craft what is necessary to deliver his thoughts to the audience. His years at Columbia College in Chicago studying painting and performance, and then later graduating from the University of Wisconsin – Green Bay with a number of photography and printmaking courses, allowed him the platform to begin his multi-disciplinary approach.

It is through this work that he wants the audience to assess the passage of time. Question our collective past, what is remembered and forgotten, and, ultimately, how we use our history to reconcile new opportunities afforded to us through modernity. With every sea-change  in our society, Andersson asks for us to consider what it does to our humanity.

SCRIPTORIUM STATEMENT

The contemporary nature of “breaking news” is that it is pervasive. It is invasive. It is an onslaught. And, it can be addictive.

Newspapers and network television have always been sources of insight, but now with the infiltration of the news into social media and alerts presented by mobile devices, I have become constantly aware of the next social or political concern that I “have to deal with.” Maybe you feel this also. Thankfully, there is the ability to lightly skim through social media. Multi-task while the television is on, and temporarily push the storylines into the background. And yet, it is hard to completely shut out.

This work asks what happens when I do the opposite of tuning out and instead completely submerse myself into the unpredictable current of my Twitter feed and news alerts. I ask myself what are the opinions, and what are facts? I question the mechanisms of deliverance. And then, ultimately, wonder how unpredictable any of this really is. This work is the product of six months of forced inundation, and it hopes to answer what the weight of all this information looks like, and possibly hints what the impact has been upon me – and perhaps you too.

Welcome to the “Scriptorium.”


Gallery

Images courtesy of the artist.

Introducing Kim Nugent, FA 2018 Artist in Residence

We are thrilled to announce that Kim Nugent is our ninth artist in residence (AiR) at Sheboygan North High School. She is our Fall 2018 Air artist. 

The 2018-2019 Artist in Residency Program is supported by a grant from the Wisconsin Art Education Association and Kohler Foundation, Inc.

About Kim

Kim’s method of journaling often involves utilizing a picture as a starting point to spark an idea. She chooses photos that she both likes and surprisingly, dislikes. Her purpose is to develop ideas, explore techniques, and to push her creativity. Working this way jumpstarts her imagination, rendering a visual journal page that would have been hard to conceive using merely a blank sheet of paper. 

“Visual journaling has become something that I feel compelled to do. It helps me to be calm, centered and focused. Through visual journaling I express myself with or without words. In my journals: I experiment with different mediums and techniques; document important events or simple daily happenings; express my thoughts and feelings; draw, paint or collage. I have no rules. ” – Kim Nugent

GALLERY 

Images courtesy of the artist

Prototyping with Clay. What if?

The Advanced 3D Design were assigned to create a product that they felt could improve their teenage lives. Students had to write the purpose of such product, create sketches, and discuss functionality. Below are some examples of what they came up with. 


Introducing the Portable Powered Outlet

My product I did is a solar and LED powered outlet. On the top it takes in solar energy and it also takes in LED lighting. In the front it has two outlets you can plug into, it also has a place where you can see how full it is. On the back it has a concave part, that’s for hanging it on things. On the lower part of the back it has buttons where you can turn on/use the LED or solar energy, there’s also an off button where you can shut off the energy for whole thing. On one of the sides it has a place where you can store small things.


Introducing the Panhou Planter

A small pot planter that also functions as a storage unit.  A drainage hole is integrated to the bottom of the pot so as to not stress the plant out with too much water. The top drawer functions as a large unit of storage for larger items that may fit in the palm of a child’s hand. The bottom drawer consists of two shallower, half units. These two compartments may be used to store seeds that are frequently lost. Each drawer has attached onto it magenta and pink colored leaves to be used as handles for opening and closing.
The product is a light gray color, but hints of lilac purple show when looked at the right way. The top of the product is designed with organic flower and vine shapes. Along the outer walls of the product are indented designs that relate to plants and gardening.

Introducing Maddie’s Marvelous Mug

Maddie’s Marvelous Mug is the name of my invention. I created this mug to save people time so they can do more important things instead of making their favorite drink hot or cold. When you’re at work wouldn’t it be nice to have a cup of coffee that stayed warm all day? After a long run wouldn’t it be nice for your water or chocolate milk to stay cold for a long time? With my mug that is exactly what happens. 
Pick up the warm colored side pointing up and your drink is automatically warm! If you pick up the opposite side with cool colors pointing down, your drink will automatically be cold! My product will save you time and energy. 

Abstract Expressionist paintings by Drawing/Painting II

Drawing/Painting II students spent a couple weeks learning about Abstract Expressionism and the works by MAS artist, Joe Bussell. As a result of their research they were to create three (3) large scale paintings using non-traditional tools such as a putty knife. Below is a snapshot of their work. In addition, students had the opportunity to Skype with the artist.


A Reflection by Allison N

I just sort of went for it. When I started the first painting, I had no clear idea in mind, I just sort of started putting paint on the paper and it went from there. The only thing I had planned was the colors, each of the paintings have a color scheme, they aren’t just random colors thrown on the page, they all have something in common. The first painting was different shades of a lavender-purple sort of color and the last two were three pastel colors, pink, blue, and yellow. I think my paintings in particular are unique because of the colors I;ve chose, I think it gives off a more ‘playful’ and ‘lightness’ sort of feel.

I actually really enjoyed using the palette knife, it was surprisingly satisfying, the way the paint glided. I think it created a nice blend when you used multiple colors, and sometimes layered the colors with just a single stroke.

I think I created a overall feel pretty well. Each painting, to me anyway, gives off a certain feeling, for example, the first one I did gives off a feeling of motion, two things responding together as I’d put it. I think I used the color element of this project to my advantage, I wanted to used colors that would go well with each other, that I knew wouldn’t give an ugly color if I mixed them together enough. I used geometric shapes for my third painting, which was a technique that was suggested.

I knew right away that I wanted one of the paintings to look as if two different ‘forces’ were responding to each other in some way, so the first painting I did was planned. The second painting was sort of on a whim, I put a line going through the entire thing and kind of went from there. The third painting was also sort of spontaneous, though I wanted it to have clean, straight lines, which I did achieve.

I only used one, and that was a pencil. I didn’t use it a big way, I mainly used both ends to make large circles and well as smaller circles and then I made small groupings of them scattered in particular places that I’d picked. Since the painting I had used this tool for was so geometric and clean, I wanted to use to circles and dots to create contrast between the two opposite shapes.

GALLERY