End of the Year Celebration at Sheboygan North High Art Department

We end the 2018-2019 school year with two amazing programs, The National Art Honor Society (NAHS) and the Artist-in-residency Program (AiR).

The Sheboygan North High Art Department officially became a National Art Honor Society (NAHS) chapter. This is the first chapter of its kind in our North High history dedicated to the visual arts. 

Visual arts education is essential to 21st-century learning. As a new NAHS chapter we utilized the National Art Education Association (NAEA) to stay ahead of developments in the field of arts education by being introducing a broad perspective of research, issues, and policy trends that are key in art education. As a NAHS chapter we connected to thousands of chapters from around the globe who are passionate about the integral role of the visual arts in ensuring all students to receive a high-quality, effective, and well-rounded education. 

We believe that the National Art Honor Society will contribute to reaching our building goals. In addition, introducing students to a diverse art offering beyond the walls of North High will expand their minds, to participate in new art experiences, and to provide leadership opportunities, which will contribute to their personal and academic growth. Student success is very important to us and our professional goal is to assist them in their journeys.

The NAHS Chapter created three committees focused on fundraising, community outreach, and beautifying our school environment through art.

We created partnerships with the John Michael Kohler Arts Center and the MEAD Library.

Below is a collection of images that our students participated in as well as a video celebrating the completion of our “Be the Next Generation” Mural, an exit interview and artist talk with Craig Grabhorn, and poetry readings.

Gallery

Mural in progress

National Art Honor Society’s (NAHS) mural, “Be the Next Generation”, is a gift to North High School and its students. As you can see, it pictures the words, “be the next generation” underlying a sprouting seedling. Planning the mural, we wanted the sprout to symbolize everyone who feels lost or isolated while also standing for growth. Nature is an empowering force. No matter where, it finds a way. Even from the concrete, nature erects itself in masses of green foliage. A sproutling is small, inferior, and feeble. We could easily uproot it with our bare hands, but sproutlings grow. They persevere between the concrete and with time they rise to the sky and become towering trees. We are the trees, we can grow and become greater things. We have always persisted; from the very beginning when we were wild and instinctual, to now where we face the stresses of everyday life. We grow and adapt. We become today and the rising suns of tomorrow.        

The word “generation” is a major point of the mural. Each letter was painted by a different member of NAHS with what they perceived as “the next generation” or simply their thoughts on the phrase and their inspirations. By incorporating the “art” into the word “generation” we are literally proclaiming that what we, all of us, aspire for in the future will become the next generation. 

We want to encourage and inspire the generations of now to take a stand for both others and themselves, regardless of their skin color, their background, their gender, their sexual orientation, and etc. You don’t have to conform to the society of yesterday. Be who you want to be and who you need to be for the good of the world. – Sara Vang, grade 10

Artist-in-residency with Craig Grabhorn (Exit Interview)

Hear what he has to say about his experience at North High as a visiting artist.

Video: End of the Year Celebration at Sheboygan North High School

In this video we share with you the unveiling of “Be the Next Generation”, artist talk with Craig, and poetry readings by students & advisor (in response to Craig’s art).

Sheboygan North High Choir graphic notation (music)

For the past few months, NHS AiR artist Cooper Diers worked with several staff and students. It was great to see Cooper connect through music & art. 

Below are the performances of the graphic score for the Vocal Spring Recital (including a backstage clip of the students working through the piece before taking it to the stage). People attending the concert were encouraged to come up to a table with the paper and markers and draw, write, make a symbol or mark and it would be performed as music later in the evening. The audience and the performing students seemed to equally enjoy the experience and it was a real treat for me to be a part of the creation of it.

Videos courtesy of Cooper Diers. 

Artist Melanie Ariens visits Sheboygan North High Art Department

image courtesy of the artist

Melanie Ariens is a multi media artist with a passion for the Great Lakes and freshwater issues.  Her work is her advocacy, communicating about and celebrating our shared water resources.  As Artist-in-Residence for Milwaukee Water Commons,  she plans and facilitates creative, water inspired art experiences for local water leaders and community groups believing art has the power to inspire and engage the community in social and environmental issues.

Melanie received her Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1992, specializing in painting, drawing and printmaking, but has always enjoyed mixing it up, collaborating and experimenting, allowing the concept determine the media.

Why JustLoveNOH8?

Since childhood, I have always found hate strong and scary, and have felt downright terrified if I ever felt close to feeling it. Many years back, when I was fearful I was feeling true hatred, my father said that when we feel that way, we needed to recognize that we were in a place that required more compassion. Nothing productive comes from a place of hate and no healing can happen unless there is civil discourse and an effort to understand each other. This might sound funny, but a few years after that incident, I don’t know where he found them, but he gave me some No Hate running socks – just the word HATE on the cuff with that red circle with the slash through it. I still have those socks and my teenage daughter has swiped them from me, but I am glad that message is still running around my house.

I was exhausted and distressed after 2016 campaigning season and election, and still am, and you may be, too. My way of dealing with this has been to design this iconic image and promote the very basic, but often difficult, idea of not hating. Others have promoted NOH8 in the LGBTQ community and beyond. I had a deep desire to contribute to that effort and expand on it to an even broader concept of inclusion and love, for Immigrants, Blacks, Veterans, Disabled, Women, and any other group that feels marginalized, including people that don’t think like me.  

This has been a rich and healing endeavor, with friends joining me in the studio to print, people taking the posters to marches, hanging them in their windows, and gifting them to friends. I have been generous with the design and have allowed other organizations to print the design to spread this positive message in their community. At this point, I estimate 2000+ posters have been printed. I hope this story along with these prints & stickers, is healing for you, too! And if you have read this far, I am so deeply appreciative of your time and attention in thinking about this with me. Join me in the NOH8 community.

 

Gallery 

Abstract Expressionist paintings by Drawing/Painting II

Drawing/Painting II students spent a couple weeks learning about Abstract Expressionism and the works by MAS artist, Joe Bussell. As a result of their research they were to create three (3) large scale paintings using non-traditional tools such as a putty knife. Below is a snapshot of their work. In addition, students had the opportunity to Skype with the artist.


A Reflection by Allison N

I just sort of went for it. When I started the first painting, I had no clear idea in mind, I just sort of started putting paint on the paper and it went from there. The only thing I had planned was the colors, each of the paintings have a color scheme, they aren’t just random colors thrown on the page, they all have something in common. The first painting was different shades of a lavender-purple sort of color and the last two were three pastel colors, pink, blue, and yellow. I think my paintings in particular are unique because of the colors I;ve chose, I think it gives off a more ‘playful’ and ‘lightness’ sort of feel.

I actually really enjoyed using the palette knife, it was surprisingly satisfying, the way the paint glided. I think it created a nice blend when you used multiple colors, and sometimes layered the colors with just a single stroke.

I think I created a overall feel pretty well. Each painting, to me anyway, gives off a certain feeling, for example, the first one I did gives off a feeling of motion, two things responding together as I’d put it. I think I used the color element of this project to my advantage, I wanted to used colors that would go well with each other, that I knew wouldn’t give an ugly color if I mixed them together enough. I used geometric shapes for my third painting, which was a technique that was suggested.

I knew right away that I wanted one of the paintings to look as if two different ‘forces’ were responding to each other in some way, so the first painting I did was planned. The second painting was sort of on a whim, I put a line going through the entire thing and kind of went from there. The third painting was also sort of spontaneous, though I wanted it to have clean, straight lines, which I did achieve.

I only used one, and that was a pencil. I didn’t use it a big way, I mainly used both ends to make large circles and well as smaller circles and then I made small groupings of them scattered in particular places that I’d picked. Since the painting I had used this tool for was so geometric and clean, I wanted to use to circles and dots to create contrast between the two opposite shapes.

GALLERY

Celebrate Youth Art Month

Did you know that March is Youth Art Month? 

Congratulations to the following art students. These students will be representing the Sheboygan North High art department in Madison and in Sheboygan. 

In Sheboygan the following students’ work has been selected to participate in the John Michael Kohler Arts Center’s Youth Art Month Celebration. They are Elena B, Elena K, Maddie L, Tou V (teacher Ms. Mattern) and Allison N, Emma A, Gabe L, Arthur L, and Tyler G (teacher Mr. Juarez).  There is a public reception on March 5th from 11am – 3pm at JMKAC, 608 New York Avenue in Sheboygan.

In Madison the following students will be exhibiting their art at the Wisconsin Art Education Association Youth Art Month Celebration at the State Capitol. They are Elizabeth, Jenny, Emma (teacher Ms. Mattern) and Julia A, Rita D, and Allison N (teacher Mr. Juarez). There is a public reception on March 31st from 12-1pm at the Rotunda, 2 E Main St, Madison, WI 53703.

About Youth Art Month

Source: SchoolArts Magazine, March 2017


yamscholastic

Photo credit: Frank Juarez