Artist Lecture Series kicks off in October with artist, Cristian Andersson

CRISTIAN ANDERSSON, ARTIST (APPLETON)

October 11, 2018

Period 6

Room 221

(not open to the public)

click image to enlarge

BIO

Cristian Andersson is an artist working in Appleton, Wisconsin. While much of his work tends towards abstract painting, he believes that the medium must fit the message and will experiment with installation and performance based mechanisms to craft what is necessary to deliver his thoughts to the audience. His years at Columbia College in Chicago studying painting and performance, and then later graduating from the University of Wisconsin – Green Bay with a number of photography and printmaking courses, allowed him the platform to begin his multi-disciplinary approach.

It is through this work that he wants the audience to assess the passage of time. Question our collective past, what is remembered and forgotten, and, ultimately, how we use our history to reconcile new opportunities afforded to us through modernity. With every sea-change  in our society, Andersson asks for us to consider what it does to our humanity.

SCRIPTORIUM STATEMENT

The contemporary nature of “breaking news” is that it is pervasive. It is invasive. It is an onslaught. And, it can be addictive.

Newspapers and network television have always been sources of insight, but now with the infiltration of the news into social media and alerts presented by mobile devices, I have become constantly aware of the next social or political concern that I “have to deal with.” Maybe you feel this also. Thankfully, there is the ability to lightly skim through social media. Multi-task while the television is on, and temporarily push the storylines into the background. And yet, it is hard to completely shut out.

This work asks what happens when I do the opposite of tuning out and instead completely submerse myself into the unpredictable current of my Twitter feed and news alerts. I ask myself what are the opinions, and what are facts? I question the mechanisms of deliverance. And then, ultimately, wonder how unpredictable any of this really is. This work is the product of six months of forced inundation, and it hopes to answer what the weight of all this information looks like, and possibly hints what the impact has been upon me – and perhaps you too.

Welcome to the “Scriptorium.”


Gallery

Images courtesy of the artist.

NHS Art Trip to New York 2017

Over spring break, Mr. Juarez and 6 art students traveled to New York City to see art and experience the city’s vibrant culture and high energy. Here is a snapshot of what these students experienced. In addition to the art, they also visited Ellis Island, Chinatown, Little Italy, Radio City Music Hall, Rockerfeller Plaza, Top of the Rock, Central Park, saw Miss Saigon, and even met one of the Rockettes!

Gallery

Interview with artist, Rafael Francisco Salas

This month we had art professor and artist, Rafael Francisco Salas visit North High to share his art, influences, and process with our students. 

Rafael Francisco Salas, Untitled Portrait (Houses), oil on canvas, 22 x 42 inches, 2010

Rafael Francisco Salas, Untitled Portrait (Houses), oil on canvas, 22 x 42 inches, 2010

North High Art Department: What/who is your biggest inspiration?

Rafael Francisco Salas: I mentioned a few influential artists – Isa Genzken, Cy Twombly,  and Byzantine artwork

In addition, old country music as it relates the landscape, and then of course the landscape of rural Wisconsin itself.

NHAD: What is your favorite medium to work with?

RFS: Oil paint and charcoal

NHAD: When did you start painting?

RFS: I always was interested in making art, but didn’t begin oil painting until I was about 23 years old.

NHAD: At what age did you start being an artist?

RFS: Pretty much my whole life.

NHAD: Why did you choose to do abstract painting?

RFS: Great question. Abstract art (to me) is able to communicate beyond language. If a painting has a human figure, a viewer responds with the knowledge that the painting has a person in it. But abstraction requires a different reading, that is more personal and emotional. It comes from the gut.

NHAD: How long does it take to finish a painting?

RFS: Sometimes they move along quite quickly, like two or three weeks. Other times a couple of months.

NHAD: Do you enjoy changing your media & materials?

RFS: It’s exciting and very challenging to work with new materials. Sometimes it’s a disaster!

NHAD: Is all of your work based on your experiences?

RFS: Yes, most of it is pretty autobiographical. It’s what I know.

NHAD: What made you want to go into art/study art?

RFS: I always enjoyed it and was inspired to make art. Plus I was never good at anything else!

Artist Statement: 

My current artistic project begins by describing the landscape and its moods that I have observed in Wisconsin.  They include natural occurrences as well as man-made events and architecture which complement and conflict. Our creations and habits rub up against what is native or wild. Those interactions describe our new selves.

The use of non-representational and still life elements in my artwork creates a dichotomy between figure and ground, between the perceived and the felt. Like the nature of the landscapes I observe, the artwork aspires toward a certain nobility, but often illuminates a poignant contrast to that aspiration.

Country music is the appropriate soundtrack.

About The Artist Lecture Series

The Artist Lecture Series is an in-school program at Sheboygan North High School that invites local and regional visual artists to share their journey as artists with the beginning, intermediate, and advanced art classes. Visiting artists present and expose art students to such as but not limited to: a digital portfolio, actual artworks, talk about about careers, and the opportunity to interact with the artists. This program is organized by the Sheboygan North High Art Department. 

Design it Yourself Gallery Project: A deeper look into the 365 Artists 365 Days Project

Appleton art teacher, Elyse Lucas collaborated with Kate Mothes of Young Space inspires high school art students to research, collaborate, and design their own gallery. Mr. Juarez’s 365 Artists 365 Days Project provided students with a list of artists whose works were explored for the curation of the exhibitions that were organized within their own galleries. 

It is such a rewarding experience to see this project inspire students to look at the [art] world through a different lens. When this project was released on January 1, 2014 the primary intent was to introduce our readership to contemporary artists, studio cultures, and diversity in media from across the globe. It is neat to see this project implemented within a secondary art curriculum and to see the possibilities unfold. – Mr. Juarez, art educator and founder of 365 Artists 365 Days Project.

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Ms. Elyse Lucas’s unit: Design it Yourself Gallery Project

Unit and images courtesy of the teacher and used with permission. 

Objective: Design your own art exhibition in your own imaginary gallery. The artwork and gallery space must work together to invoke a common theme. Students may select any contemporary art pieces from the list of contemporary artists on Frank Juarez “365 Artists in 365 days” website. Students may design any space that the artwork will be hung. Student will create 3D models of their gallery space as well as an exhibition guide showcasing their selected artwork and describing their theme. Student will then present their ideas to professional curator Kate Mothes. Student will gain a greater understanding of contemporary art, art appreciation, art criticism, and the value to art in a community.

Requirements:

Research on Artwork

  • Select 8-12 pieces of contemporary art from Frank Juarez’s website “365 Artists in 365 Days”
  • Artwork must have common theme (aesthetically or message)
  • Describe artist’s intent with artwork (chart)

3D Model of Gallery

  • Must be made out of cardboard
  • Must be 3D and painted white
  • Must be laid out with where artwork goes and why

Exhibition guide for show

  • Must include mission statement about the show (intent or what message you want the viewer to observe)
  • Paragraph about each artist and description of their artwork

Presentation

  • About 20 minutes long
  • Re-state mission statement and intent with the show
  • Explain why you designed the space in a certain shape
  • Explain why you hung artwork in certain spots
  • Explain what you learned through this process

Standards:

  • Art Theory: Visual Thinking : Vocabulary Use (id:9968)
  • Art Theory: Visual Thinking : Interpretation/Evaluation (id:9969)
  • Art Theory: Visual Thinking : Formulates Opinion (id:9971)
  • Art Theory: Visual Thinking : Personal Opinion (id:9974)
  • Communication Arts 9. : Key Ideas and Details 2 (id:10151)
  • Communication Arts 9. : Production and Distribution of Writing 2 (id:10167)
  • Communication Arts 9. : Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas 3 (id:10177)

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Design it yourself Art Gallery: Research

Directions: Visit Frank Juarez’s website “365artists365days.com.” Click on the “Artist Database” link at the top and then “Download 2014/5 Artist Database” link. You can choose to look up an artist based on their medium (materials they used to make art) or theme/category they fall under. Visit the artist’s website, find images of their work, read about their intent/process. If you like an artist or think it works with a theme, add information to the chart below. Explore all sorts of artists, themes and mediums until you find one you appreciate/find aesthetic connection to. Collect 8-12 pieces for your show and print thumbnail picture of each piece.

Researching Artists-Artwork

Design it yourself Art Gallery: Research

Post-Research Reflection: Respond to the following prompts thoughtfully and thoroughly. Based on your reflection, write your show’s “Mission Statement” below.

  • What is similar about all these artists?
  • What mediums are the works made of? Where are the artists from?
  • What overall theme does the artwork have (aesthetics or meaning)?
  • Why will these works make a unified show?
  • What do you hope the viewer will take away from visiting your show?
  • What did you learn about your own aesthetics/taste in art through this research process?

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DIY Gallery: Community Engagement Piece

Directions: Design a community engagement piece to accompany your exhibition. What is something that will greet the public and encourage them to have a voice about your art show’s theme? Engagement piece should be something interactive that either remains in the gallery or people can take with them. Be creative and build off of your theme!

Requirements:

  • Piece should relate to the theme of your art show
  • Piece should be interactive
  • Prompt people to participate (see/feel the impact)
  • Remain in space or people take with them (memory)
  • Quick activity (less than five minutes)
  • Minimal supplies/mess

Ideas to build off of and adapt to your show:

  • Writing prompt (Kate’s show)
  • Collaborative drawing (Tedx talk)
  • Collaborative sticky notes mural (Tedx talk)
  • Take away card/gift/message (Felix Gonzalez Torres)
  • Be Creative!!! Think of your own!!!

Describe your community engagement piece below:

  • Describe the activity in 5-7 sentences (include a sketch as necessary)
  • What do you want people to take away from the activity?
  • What materials are necessary to the activity?
  • How does the activity relate to your theme?

Describe your community engagement piece below:

  • Describe the activity in 5-7 sentences (include a sketch as necessary)
  • What do you want people to take away from the activity?
  • What materials are necessary to the activity?
  • How does the activity relate to your theme?

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Design it yourself Gallery: Exhibition Guide

Directions: Create your own exhibition guide for your art show. Exhibition guide should walk your viewers through your art show and provide them with necessary information so they understand your theme/message of the show and layout of your gallery. Students may use Indesign or Publisher to create their 2-3 page guidebook.

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Requirements:

Exhibition guide with likely be a trifold or booklet and must include the following:

Title/Cover Page:

  • Title of your gallery
  • Title of your art show
  • Picture (one attractive piece of artwork that represents the show)

Information about the show:

  • Location (imaginary location-city, state)
  • Run time (imaginary dates-2 weeks, 2 months, other)   
  • Mission statement of show
  • Map of the gallery/digital Homestyler.com model

Information about the art:

  • Artist, Title, Date, Medium of every piece of art in show
  • Small paragraph/blurb about each artist and their piece
  • Selective photos of work (not for every piece but range of work)

Information about your gallery:

  • Who are the curators (that’s you!)
  • Why did you choose to design your gallery the way you did?
  • What future shows would you like to hold in your gallery?

Note: Please use an attractive layout, font, colors and visuals that all work with your art show’s theme and is inviting to the public.

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DIY Gallery: Model

IMG_7709Objective: Design a model of your gallery space that help articulates your gallery’s mission statement and showcases the selected artwork. One model should be completed digitally with http://www.homestyler.com. You will need to create an account with your school email for this site. One model should be 3D and made out of cardboard. Students should paint cardboard white and include a key for the model explaining where artwork will go. Research other art galleries and museums and consider their layout when designing your own. Consider traditional elements of a gallery including blank slate layout (white walls, wood floors, artwork as focal point). Consider sizing of artwork when planning what pieces go where (an instillation piece should have adequate space for viewer to walk around piece, 6ft painting will need larger wall so work has space, etc.)

Requirements:

  • 1 Model should be made digitally with homestyler.com
  • 1 Model should be constructed 3D
    • Made out of cardboard and hot glue
    • Painted white walls
  • Clear simple layout (complements the art)
  • Considerate arrangement of work (pieces thematically tell story)
  • Artwork sizing considered
  • Key/chart:
    • indication where artwork is hung
    • compass/label for bearings
    • title of the gallery
    • mission statement of gallery
    • thumbnail picture of art pieces (8-12)
    • statement explaining gallery design and layout (why pieces go where)

DIY Gallery: Model statement

Explain your thought process is designing the gallery space. Why did you choose this layout? How does the layout relate to your gallery’s mission statement and theme of the art show? What other art galleries/museums did you look at for inspiration for your gallery? What pieces needed extra consideration for placement? (7-9 sentences at least)

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Design it yourself Gallery: Presentation

Directions: Pitch your gallery idea to Kate Mothes and Ms. Lucas! Presentation should be 15 mins in length and both partners should be actively participating equally. Discuss all components to your gallery including the following: information about the show, art pieces/research process, exhibition guide, layout (digital and scale model), community engagement piece.

Information on show: (3 mins)

  • Title of gallery and exhibition
  • Mission statement
  • Theme of the exhibition
  • Describe artists and their pieces (artist, title, date, medium, meaning)

Research process: (3 mins)

  • Why did you pick the pieces you did?
  • What were some hardships with finding your artists?
  • Why were you drawn to the pieces?
  • What did you learn about your own taste in art through this process?

Exhibition Guide: (3 mins)

  • Why did you design your guide this way?
  • What hardships did you have when creating your guide?

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Layout of gallery (models): (3 mins)

  • Why did you arrange your model/gallery layout this way?
  • What hardships did you overcome in planning out the location of your pieces or what special considerations did your artwork require?

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Community Engagement: (3 mins)

  • What activity did you provide the public?
  • What are you hoping people take away from participating in activity?
  • How does your activity relate to your theme?
  • Why is it important to have a community engagement piece?

*** Note: This is a formal presentation. Please introduce yourself and conduct yourself professionally in front of our community members. Please rehearse your presentation with your partner in advanced so you meet time and response expectations. Please hold up/display model and guide when describing these pieces. Can provide powerpoint of enlarged images when describing art pieces if desired.

Presentation Feedback (see front of this sheet also):

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Project Feedback (see individual sheets also):

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Unit and images courtesy of the teacher and used with permission. 

Below is the article that was published on April 11, 2016 by The Post Crescent. 

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Midwest artist, Jessica Anderson, visits Sheboygan North High art students

On March 14, MAS artist, Jessica Anderson, spent the day at Sheboygan North High School connecting with students through her project, Meditation Walking, as the basis for her meditation drawings that she facilitated with Drawing/Painting II, AP Studio Art, and Senior Art 2 students. Jessica is one of our Year 2 MAS artists. 

Jessica’s artist statement states:

Part research, part design, part invention – my work navigates the boundary between mind and body through a re-contextualized lens of science, medicine, and biologic phenomena. Reminiscent of laboratory investigations, my invented scenarios answer questions with questions and provoke participatory explorations of the individual self.  

Taking the position as neither a skeptic nor a promoter, my research examines the role of holistic healing practices in contemporary culture. I am interested in individual relationships within these mechanisms of health and provide viewers with opportunities to test their own boundaries of belief. Reframing practices such as a detoxifying footbath, a chi activation machine, and phenomenological exercises, my re-contextualization of existing treatments heightens the tension of purpose, and provides viewers with neutral environments of investigation. 

Merging factual information with reinvented application allows me to expand the dialogue of cognitive occurrences. For instance, EMDR therapy asks patients to lean their head to the left to access thoughts and to lean their head to the right to access feelings and emotions. Redirecting this information, I then ask: Is there a discernible difference between these two cerebral directions when drawing a line? 

It is a question that can only be answered through experience, observation, and communally applied analytics. 

In my work, invitations for experience occur through demonstrative videos, interactive objects/devices, evocative statements of research, and performative exercises. Together, each of these installation elements create a multi-dimensional environment of investigative viewing, biologic questioning, and experiential answering. By repositioning scientifically grounded phenomena into the context of a gallery, information begins to transcend ratiocination and calls upon a physical conversation between mind, body, and personal experience. 

Katie, drawing/painting II student, writes, “the meditation drawing experience was very different from what I was expecting going into it. My mind works in a very mechanical fashion so I thought that I would not be able to relax and have my hand wander for a period of time. I found myself having completely letting go. Tracking time was impossible. When just sitting and doing nothing, 10 minutes felt like an eternity. Time was called when I thought we were only half way through. After completing the session, I felt more relaxed, more confident in my decisions, and more sensitive to my surroundings. I would gladly doing this again and recommend it to anyone. 

Abrille, drawing/painting II student, writes, “I felt that with this meditation drawing it was weird. At First, it was different because I never done it before. I learned that basically letting your mind take over your hand. You do not exactly create something recognizable. I thought this idea was cool because I never thought you could meditate through art. I was pretty excited with trying something new. In the end Id did get comfortable with doing this. By the time we were finished I was really relaxed, but when I opened my eyes to see what I drew it was unexpected.

Brittany, drawing/painting II student, writes, “Jessica did an amazing job! It was a great experience. I would do it all of the time. I felt refreshed. My mind was at peace. 

Mikayla, AP Studio Art student, writes, my experience during the meditation drawing was calming. I wasn’t thinking about what I was drawing, but more what I was feeling. This process taught me that to create art, I do not need to always necessarily think it through, but express how I’m feeling. I also learned that meditation drawing is the releasing of one’s mind. The thoughts and expressions in our minds flow directly into our hand and create an image on paper. When introduced to this process I was very interested. It seemed very stress free and enjoyable. After it was all done, the meditation drawing session made me feel very relaxed. I was also quite surprised by how my drawing looked. It pretty much was a bunch of scribbles, but nonetheless very enjoyable. 

Running Time: 14:17 with a 6:21 introduction by Jessica. 

Gallery

AIR Happenings as of April 24th

This week Sara had a blast collaging with Tiffany Diven’s Broadcasting class! As a way of exploring methods on how to be more present and disconnect from the constant barrage of technology around them, students spent two class periods creating analog collages made with a variety of found materials.

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More traditional collage materials such as magazine, newspaper and book scraps were incorporated into their pieces along with less conventional ones like food and 3-dimensional objects.  A lot of thought and creativity were also put into the presentation of these collages, as many students utilized both sides of the paper and others made their work more sculptural or interactive. Students’ openness to experiment with the materials available and not feel limited with what they could do was inspiring to watch!

These collages will be on display in North’s 2nd Floor Gallery space until May 13th.

AIR Happenings as of April 16th

Spring is off to a busy start! Besides gearing up for the upcoming art activities planned for several classes, Sara has been preparing for the two-person show she will be a part of opening May 9th at the Frank Juarez Gallery as well as the exhibition she will have at the end of May in North’s 2nd Floor Gallery. Below are some studio views of in-progress work for these two shows!

AIR Happenings as of March 19th

Mind mapping is still going strong in Ms. Cavanaugh and Ms. J’s classes! Below is more of the progress made on these maps during week 2. Everyone is really looking forward to seeing these in their completed forms!

Sara also met with students in Chad Stauber Soik’s Humanities class to help brainstorm ideas for the art component of their current essays which include topics such as religion, hope, and technology. Drawing, photography, and other visual mediums were discussed to figure out how to best present each student’s concept.

In the studio, there are collages and drawings everywhere! Sara has been busy creating pieces for her upcoming two-person show, In Tandem, opening in May at the Frank Juarez Gallery.