End of the Year Celebration at Sheboygan North High Art Department

We end the 2018-2019 school year with two amazing programs, The National Art Honor Society (NAHS) and the Artist-in-residency Program (AiR).

The Sheboygan North High Art Department officially became a National Art Honor Society (NAHS) chapter. This is the first chapter of its kind in our North High history dedicated to the visual arts. 

Visual arts education is essential to 21st-century learning. As a new NAHS chapter we utilized the National Art Education Association (NAEA) to stay ahead of developments in the field of arts education by being introducing a broad perspective of research, issues, and policy trends that are key in art education. As a NAHS chapter we connected to thousands of chapters from around the globe who are passionate about the integral role of the visual arts in ensuring all students to receive a high-quality, effective, and well-rounded education. 

We believe that the National Art Honor Society will contribute to reaching our building goals. In addition, introducing students to a diverse art offering beyond the walls of North High will expand their minds, to participate in new art experiences, and to provide leadership opportunities, which will contribute to their personal and academic growth. Student success is very important to us and our professional goal is to assist them in their journeys.

The NAHS Chapter created three committees focused on fundraising, community outreach, and beautifying our school environment through art.

We created partnerships with the John Michael Kohler Arts Center and the MEAD Library.

Below is a collection of images that our students participated in as well as a video celebrating the completion of our “Be the Next Generation” Mural, an exit interview and artist talk with Craig Grabhorn, and poetry readings.

Gallery

Mural in progress

National Art Honor Society’s (NAHS) mural, “Be the Next Generation”, is a gift to North High School and its students. As you can see, it pictures the words, “be the next generation” underlying a sprouting seedling. Planning the mural, we wanted the sprout to symbolize everyone who feels lost or isolated while also standing for growth. Nature is an empowering force. No matter where, it finds a way. Even from the concrete, nature erects itself in masses of green foliage. A sproutling is small, inferior, and feeble. We could easily uproot it with our bare hands, but sproutlings grow. They persevere between the concrete and with time they rise to the sky and become towering trees. We are the trees, we can grow and become greater things. We have always persisted; from the very beginning when we were wild and instinctual, to now where we face the stresses of everyday life. We grow and adapt. We become today and the rising suns of tomorrow.        

The word “generation” is a major point of the mural. Each letter was painted by a different member of NAHS with what they perceived as “the next generation” or simply their thoughts on the phrase and their inspirations. By incorporating the “art” into the word “generation” we are literally proclaiming that what we, all of us, aspire for in the future will become the next generation. 

We want to encourage and inspire the generations of now to take a stand for both others and themselves, regardless of their skin color, their background, their gender, their sexual orientation, and etc. You don’t have to conform to the society of yesterday. Be who you want to be and who you need to be for the good of the world. – Sara Vang, grade 10

Artist-in-residency with Craig Grabhorn (Exit Interview)

Hear what he has to say about his experience at North High as a visiting artist.

Video: End of the Year Celebration at Sheboygan North High School

In this video we share with you the unveiling of “Be the Next Generation”, artist talk with Craig, and poetry readings by students & advisor (in response to Craig’s art).

Sharing Student Success: Get Published in SchoolArts Magazine

In 2015, the Sheboygan North High art department had its first student artwork published in SchoolArts Magazine. We were so thrilled to see our student’s work published in a national art education magazine. Seeing the expressions on our students’ faces when we tell them that their work has been published is priceless. To date, we continue to have our students’ work published.

No matter what you teach, it is important to show the world the quality of student work that is being created inside the classroom. As professionals, it is our responsibility to seek out those opportunities to help our students shine. We will never know what type of impact it can have on a student unless we try. Make it happen. 

Welcome to the 2018/2019 school year!

NHS Art Trip to New York 2017

Over spring break, Mr. Juarez and 6 art students traveled to New York City to see art and experience the city’s vibrant culture and high energy. Here is a snapshot of what these students experienced. In addition to the art, they also visited Ellis Island, Chinatown, Little Italy, Radio City Music Hall, Rockerfeller Plaza, Top of the Rock, Central Park, saw Miss Saigon, and even met one of the Rockettes!

Gallery

Celebrate Youth Art Month

Did you know that March is Youth Art Month? 

Congratulations to the following art students. These students will be representing the Sheboygan North High art department in Madison and in Sheboygan. 

In Sheboygan the following students’ work has been selected to participate in the John Michael Kohler Arts Center’s Youth Art Month Celebration. They are Elena B, Elena K, Maddie L, Tou V (teacher Ms. Mattern) and Allison N, Emma A, Gabe L, Arthur L, and Tyler G (teacher Mr. Juarez).  There is a public reception on March 5th from 11am – 3pm at JMKAC, 608 New York Avenue in Sheboygan.

In Madison the following students will be exhibiting their art at the Wisconsin Art Education Association Youth Art Month Celebration at the State Capitol. They are Elizabeth, Jenny, Emma (teacher Ms. Mattern) and Julia A, Rita D, and Allison N (teacher Mr. Juarez). There is a public reception on March 31st from 12-1pm at the Rotunda, 2 E Main St, Madison, WI 53703.

About Youth Art Month

Source: SchoolArts Magazine, March 2017


yamscholastic

Photo credit: Frank Juarez

Interview with Artist – Justin Thao, NHS art alumnus (2010)

This month we had NHS art alumnus and artist, Justin Thao visit North High to share his art, influences, and process with our students. The questions below were provided by the Advanced 3D Design students. 

img_5233-1024x533

North High Art Dept: Do you create your own papers?

Justin Thao: As a designer, we are trained to understand the overall process of developing an idea into a marketable product. I am currently not making my own paper just in case I have to mass produce my work to supply demand. But in the long run I am considering making my own paper to give the piece more value and innovative feature. But I do creative my own graphic patterns, which I can print in my room.

NHAD: If you make a wrong crease, do you start all over?

JT: People underestimate how important it is to fail. I have made so many bad creases over all in my life that I just throw them away. But there are some that I keep so that I may be able to recreate those folds and hopefully find something better. Most of my innovative origami pieces are created by making random creases.

NHAD: At what age did you realize what you were really passionate about?

JT: I realized that I was good at folding origami back in Elementary school. It all just came naturally to me. I understood the fundamentals of folding paper but I merely took it as a hobby. Beginning my journey as an artist in my freshman year at North High in Mr. Juarez’s class was the initiation of my art/design career. Even though I did not know where art would take me, I took a leap of faith and trusted in what I was good at. Through long hours, hard effort, and concentrated focus, I am able to find the purpose of my skills.

img_5345-640x422

NHAD: How did you come up with your designs?

JT: They are all generated by accident. Let me explain. With a sense of direction and knowledge of the kind of folds needed to create a desired look or functionality, I was able to find interesting folding features. It’s like digging for gold and suddenly you find gold after hours of searching. But of course as I am folding paper, I am always keeping a watching eye on how the paper evolves and learning what it can do. Through several experiments and understanding of the folding designs, I am able to create these innovative origami pieces.

NHAD: How long do you take to work on your designs?

JT: Many of my work take either several months or years. Some of my simple designs may take a day to make, but those type of simple work do not evolve much. Some of my work like the mushroom lamp is taking me 2 years overall because it started when I accidentely made the smaller mushroom origami more than 2 years ago. Then recently this year I just started to push this mushroom origami into a valuable product. Some of my work do take a couple of months or years, but I do have smaller projects on the side that occupy my time. I am always working on something.

NHAD: How long does it take you to fold the papers?

JT: Some of the origami pieces may take 10 minutes and they usually do not turn into anything special. But the ones that take more than 30 minutes usually turn out well. One of my project back then involved folding a gear out of paper. After taking 2 to 3 hours to figure out the patterns, making the final product took me nearly an hour just to fold. No matter how long it takes for you to do your own work, you need the passion to endure the process because without passion, you will find yourself tired and dragging your feet.

img_5475-1280x853-1

NHAD: What courses did you take in college?

JT: I did take some drawing courses where we drew naked figures all day. I involved myself with sculpture to learn how to free the creative side of myself because my design courses are about following guidelines and learning how to cope with limited creativity. I knew that learning how to be free and creative while understanding how to be precise and conservative was the answer to being a successful designer. Now these type of courses are really helpful in developing my business where I am able to push the boundaries while meeting customer satisfaction.

NHAD: Did Mr. Juarez have any influence on you at all?

JT: Mr. Juarez had a lot of influences on me. He is the one who took me under his wing and taught me the foundation of art. He guided me and corrected me when I needed it. His was even generous enough to help give me assignments to enhance my portfolio for entering Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design college.

NHAD: How did you learn to do Origami?

JT: I learned through reading origami books back when I was in high school. I had no one to teach me and there weren’t many out there nearby that could teach me. So I relied on myself through hard effort and curiosity to learn it all by myself. Once I learned how to fold some of the generic origami folds, I quickly became bored. Most of them to me were either too complicated and pointless or simple and meaningless. I am always hungry for interesting origami designs but there are way too few of them out that that can satisfy my thirst. Instead of relying on the chance of finding something, I would create them instead in order to satisfy my thirst.

NHAD: What made you start your own Origami business?

img_3355

JT: There were many reasons why I decided to start my own origami business, but here are a few of them:

  • My passion for origami became overwhelming and started to inspired everything I designed.
  • Having my own business and my own successful line of product is the only to prove to other larger companies that there is value within origami. Most people see it as an arts and craft and nothing more valuable than that.
  • Pushing my own ideas to the market is the only way I can do what I want without having larger companies control and change the ideas into something they want it to be.
  • Having the freedom to design anything I want and see it out in the market is truly satisfying.

NHAD: Do you ever get discouraged and if you do, how do you overcome it?

JT: There are always people out there who do not believe in what I am doing. Even my own family seem like they support me, but the truth is they do not. I knew before I started this path as an entrepreneur is that it is very important for me to believe in myself. If my faith in my own work is little and gentle, then it would be easy for others to break it. To stand strong against others even when I am the only one is necessary for success. But of course it is very important to be realistic with yourself and see the potential of your own work. To overcome the people who discourage my work and my business, I had to learn how to cope with my own way of thinking: to guard my mind and the kind of negative thinking that would cripple my business while being realistic all at the same time.

Interview with artist, Rafael Francisco Salas

This month we had art professor and artist, Rafael Francisco Salas visit North High to share his art, influences, and process with our students. 

Rafael Francisco Salas, Untitled Portrait (Houses), oil on canvas, 22 x 42 inches, 2010

Rafael Francisco Salas, Untitled Portrait (Houses), oil on canvas, 22 x 42 inches, 2010

North High Art Department: What/who is your biggest inspiration?

Rafael Francisco Salas: I mentioned a few influential artists – Isa Genzken, Cy Twombly,  and Byzantine artwork

In addition, old country music as it relates the landscape, and then of course the landscape of rural Wisconsin itself.

NHAD: What is your favorite medium to work with?

RFS: Oil paint and charcoal

NHAD: When did you start painting?

RFS: I always was interested in making art, but didn’t begin oil painting until I was about 23 years old.

NHAD: At what age did you start being an artist?

RFS: Pretty much my whole life.

NHAD: Why did you choose to do abstract painting?

RFS: Great question. Abstract art (to me) is able to communicate beyond language. If a painting has a human figure, a viewer responds with the knowledge that the painting has a person in it. But abstraction requires a different reading, that is more personal and emotional. It comes from the gut.

NHAD: How long does it take to finish a painting?

RFS: Sometimes they move along quite quickly, like two or three weeks. Other times a couple of months.

NHAD: Do you enjoy changing your media & materials?

RFS: It’s exciting and very challenging to work with new materials. Sometimes it’s a disaster!

NHAD: Is all of your work based on your experiences?

RFS: Yes, most of it is pretty autobiographical. It’s what I know.

NHAD: What made you want to go into art/study art?

RFS: I always enjoyed it and was inspired to make art. Plus I was never good at anything else!

Artist Statement: 

My current artistic project begins by describing the landscape and its moods that I have observed in Wisconsin.  They include natural occurrences as well as man-made events and architecture which complement and conflict. Our creations and habits rub up against what is native or wild. Those interactions describe our new selves.

The use of non-representational and still life elements in my artwork creates a dichotomy between figure and ground, between the perceived and the felt. Like the nature of the landscapes I observe, the artwork aspires toward a certain nobility, but often illuminates a poignant contrast to that aspiration.

Country music is the appropriate soundtrack.

About The Artist Lecture Series

The Artist Lecture Series is an in-school program at Sheboygan North High School that invites local and regional visual artists to share their journey as artists with the beginning, intermediate, and advanced art classes. Visiting artists present and expose art students to such as but not limited to: a digital portfolio, actual artworks, talk about about careers, and the opportunity to interact with the artists. This program is organized by the Sheboygan North High Art Department.