Now On View: Senior Art Showcase

April 8 – April 29, 2022

In this exhibition, seniors Megan Butler, Florence Butterfield, Emily Fisher, and Luecy Xiong display a sample of work that they have been working on since the start of the school year. These works are part of a larger body of work focused on a unique teen perspective ranging from fear to identity and the environment to growing up.

Coming soon – integrated Spanish tiles by Mrs. Flynn’s Spanish 5 students.


Megan Butler

“If These Walls Could Talk”

Film Photography

24 x 30 in

2022

This film photo is one of my favorite pieces so far. The shadows and the stress really bring out the mood of this shot. This abandoned house has an interesting backstory. I wanted to capture its history by bringing out the dark shadows that it naturally has. When I look at this house, or even through the windows, there are so many things that scatter my mind. When choosing a title I wanted to choose an interesting point of view. I thought it would be very fascinating to have the walls of the building tell the story. Never would I have thought of this perspective before, but this point of view would be intriguing in any building. I hope to dig deeper into this house and do a shoot from the inside out.

Megan Butler

“Disassociation”

Digital Photography

11 x 14 inches

2021

For this self-portrait, I wanted to create something that portrayed how I feel when I am photographing. By using a method called long exposure, I was able to create this abstract image. When I am photographing I feel as if I am disassociated from reality. There is something that photography provides that makes me feel like a whole new person. People do not see what is underneath just by looking at somebody or something’s surface.

Megan Butler

“Decomposition”

Woodcut Print

12 x 16 in

2022

Nature, no matter what it is, is beautiful. Whether that be plants, life, death, or decomposition. Decomposition can often be seen as unpleasant. Personally, there is so much more to it than revolting smells and sadness. The end of one life can also be beautiful. Instead of viewing death as the end of something, understand that there are many more opportunities ahead of you. Begin to realize that death is natural and beautiful in many ways.

Florence Butterfield

“Spiders of Fear”

Polymer clay, wood, and yarn

11 x 11.5 inches

2021

The spiders represent fear. It topples over one another becoming a mountain of anxiety. The anxiety is already sunken in the mind. Tangled up in its own string of web. Nesting where they feel safe. Absorbing the sounds from within not being able to use your voice. The darkness surrounds my presence, not being able to see or think.

Emily Fisher

“Greenhouse”

Watercolor

11 x 9 inches

2021

A greenhouse is both environmentally friendly and sustainable for agriculture. The benefits of this include reduced water consumption, the ability for people to grow their own food and know exactly what goes into it, and the use of ethical building materials such as glass. I incorporated all the elements of what makes a greenhouse sustainable in my piece.

Emily Fisher

“Sprout”

Digital Art

8 x 8 inches

2022

I was given the opportunity to be selected for the Innovator Fellowship, a program designed to allow students to create a project about which they are passionate. For my project, I chose to focus on the environment and create an opportunity for people to engage with the natural world. I’m accomplishing this by creating a storybook trail within Sheboygan’s Ellwood H. May Environmental Park. I’m creating and illustrating a children’s book displayed on signage along the Maple Forest Loop trail. My project aims to teach others how to be good environmental stewards through nature, physical activity, literacy, and art.

Luecy Xiong

“Sunflowers”

Pen & Ink

11×14 inches

2021

Sunflowers represent devotion and happiness. “Backstabbing” refers to the action of criticizing someone in a cruel/treacherous manner while feigning friendship. I portrayed the act of betrayal by illustrating the absolute trust an individual has lost. One’s kindness being taken advantage of is belittling, cruel, and dishonest. 

Luecy Xiong

“Sea Beyond the Horizon”

Digital

11×17 inches

2021

The overwhelming suffocation drowns the minds of many students. Some forget there is much more to life than a piece of paper- that there lies a bright light in the far distance awaiting them. I wanted to accentuate this magical-like feeling by incorporating sea life into my piece.

Luecy Xiong

“Dislike

Pen & Ink 

12.5 x 19.5 inches

2022 

We frame ourselves in a negative manner on social media. Constant comparisons, negative messages, and overwhelming hate feed onto an individual’s own esteem to the point of dissociating their online persona from their in-person self. Despite the drainage of one’s own mental capacity, many individuals continue to consume media out of helplessness, validation, and depression. 

Artist-in-resident Angela Johnson Visits Sheboygan North High School

Today artist-in-resident Angela Johnson spent the day with at North High. She facilitated a hands-on legacy box workshop with Mr. Stauber-Soik’s Honor Humanities class, presented on her work with. Mr. Cater’s photography and graphic design students, spent time with Mr. Juárez’s advanced art students doing critiques, and gave a presentation to the National Art Honor Society members. Angela has been our virtual artist this school year so it was nice for our students to meet her in person.

This artist-in-residency program is supported by a grant from the Kohler Foundation, Inc.

Introducing our Spring 2019 Artist in Residence, Craig Grabhorn


Craig Grabhorn lives and works in Sheboygan, WI. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin- Stout, he is currently employed as Community Arts Residency Coordinator with The John Michael Kohler Arts Center. He was born and raised in rural Minnesota and has made a career as a practiced designer, printmaker, painter, curator and arts organizer.

His work is inspired by a meditative exploration or observation of place and the opportunities within our natural surroundings. Through intensive listening he translates environment into material works, including prints, paintings and sculptural works. Objects he creates are often tools or vehicles of exploration, used to help capture and interpret the emotions and opportunities he finds.

Since moving to Sheboygan, Craig has been communing with Lake Michigan and the expansive horizon in a photography project titled 50over50atmos. This meditation was inspired after a two year retreat in the hills of the Driftless region to study and create a print series exploring the an- cient landscape. The 50over50atmos project documents the ever changing colors, surfaces and atmosphere of Lake Michigan as a daily capture from the same location on the shore. The prac- tice of watching with an intimacy, fuels a passion to find connection to local environment.

Craig will be with us for our Spring 2019 semester. We look forward to working with him. 

Image courtesy of the artist.